Over at Glimmerick…

June 7, 2008

Things are shaping up nicely over at Glimmerick.com, and I think I have finally nailed down a design that I really like. I have a new RSS feed setup, and a lot of cool features that I didn’t have here.

  • Add to Any– Really neat Social Book marking plugin, allowing you to email, digg, del.icio.us, Stumble Upon, (upon dozens of others) any cool stories I might write.
  • CommentLuv– When you comment on my post, if you have a blog, this tool will load your last post title w/ link at the bottom. Viewers can then be easily directed to your Blog.
  • Google Analytics – This is a really powerful, free, tool that allows users to see traffic to their site, bounce rate, average time on site, if a person directly came to my site, or was referred, etc. This allows me to help create content that is more relevant to my specific readers.

Don’t forget to check out the new site! Glimmerick.com

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New website!

June 4, 2008

Currently, I am trying to move the blog over to http://www.glimmerick.com. Please be patient while I get things moved over, and I should be posting new posts daily within a week, meanwhile I will move all of these posts over there as well. Thanks, and enjoy!


Sam Walton, Made in America

June 3, 2008

Made in America is an autobiography of sorts, written by Sam Walton with John Huey. Sam Walton is better known as the founder of Walmart. These days, just saying “Walmart” can arouse a wide array of emotions . Some people love the low prices and expansive selection, while others are outraged at supposed mistreatment of employees, while others call Walmart the “Mom and Pop store killer”. I’m not here to discuss those issues right now, but rather share little nuggets of knowledge throughout this book. The book is chalk full of important lessons about business, marketing, leadership, augmented with endless personal anecdotes. While I am reading this book, I’ll just try to share what I found to be important to me, and try and present it in a way where others can glean importance from it as well.

[My mom] told me I should always try to be the best I could at whatever I took on. -Sam Walton

This is a great mindset to have, especially when in the business of… well business. This drive that Sam Walton had is one of the largest reasons why Walmart is where it is today. He was not satisfied at just having an OK store that had OK sales. He wanted a great store with great sales, always looking for ways to improve his store, instead of idly waiting for sales to magically mushroom. I interpret this motivation as inner self will to always be improving, not greed. I hope other will see this the same way. If he was after money, he would not have lived the way he did and still does. I will be excitedly writing about this topic in upcoming posts.

I’ve always held the bar pretty high for myself; I’ve set extremely high personal goals. – Sam Walton

It is my opinion that a growing number of people are simply not applying themselves in their classes, or careers. Some are happy with the mediocre, which in a way is sad, however, we have God given talents that should not be wasted. I would encourage all of you to find an area that is of interest to all of you, and just go for it. If you have been thinking of creating a website for awhile, get educated, and go do it. If you have been mulling over the thought of learning a new skill related to your field, more times than not, the only thing stopping you is you. Whatever you desire to do, develop the will power to do it, and get excited about it, and set goals.

The Bottom Line:

  • Try and set lofty goals for yourself, and learn to challenge yourself.
  • Try your best in all areas of your life, do not develop a passive nature.
  • ” Failure is not the worst thing in the world. The very worst is not to try.”- Anonymous

Your money or your life.

June 2, 2008

A friend told me today about a bumper sticker that he saw the other day, “Whoever has the most toys when he dies wins!” While we may laugh at this statement, realizing how ignorant it is, too many people live like this. Many people work extra overtime or two jobs to pay off that house they cannot afford, the fancy BMW parked outside, or to pay off outlandish credit card debt. Of course, some people just need to work that much to support their families, which is commendable. Though this may be the case for some, many others are just living outside of their means. I often hear people say they work so much so that they can provide a better standard of living for their family; one that they did not have growing up. What do you think your family will value more? A more expensive car, or spending more time together as a family? Just some thoughts to ponder…

When people outlive their bank accounts, other elements in their lives are sure to suffer. I have heard of many families that have had strained relations because of debt problems, living pay check to pay check, and constant working. I am no expert on relationships or finances, but I do know what is important to me in life. If I had a choice to have that new plasma TV, or to spend more time with my family and friends over the years, I would always choose family and friends. When people were asked “If you could change one thing you did in your life”, common responses are “spend more time with my family” “being with my children growing up”, “make a positive impact on more people’s lives” etc.  While I would usually not quote people from a forum, this one comment struck me personally:

I believe whoever dies with the most people who have loved them and will miss them and is in the good graces of God will win. -User in a forum(thekingcobra63)

Bottom line: Make sure your relationships are not being compromised by “getting the most toys”.


How old is too old to be spoon fed?

June 1, 2008

When we were babies or even small toddlers, it would be foolish to try and teach us how to feed ourselves. Not only are we not physically capable, we have about a 50/50 chance of eating something non-edible versus something that has some nutritional value. As we grow older, we become more able to feed ourselves and more knowledgeable as to what is beneficial to eat. At a certain age, presumably, we are no longer told what to eat, and how to eat it.

As far as I am concerned, this is analogous to education. In preschool and kindergarten, our reading and writing skills are somewhat lacking, and we learn whatever teachers tell us, or maybe whatever is on Sesame Street or Blue’s Clues on a particular day. I would wish that all of us were blessed with great parents that also taught us many important life lessons, but I know that many do not. As we grow older we are encouraged, or ought to be encouraged, by those influential figures around us to read books, and begin to learn about topics on our own in, addition to those taught in the classroom. Below is a very interesting quote from Steven Covey, about how Americans are educated these days.

It’s a fact that more people watch television and get their information that way than read books.

One of my biggest pet peeves, and I am guilty of this from time to time, is when people talk about a subject, and they use information they heard on TV to support their argument. Granted, this is not always bad, but using “facts” from TV can get you into trouble from time to time. This is, and will be, especially relevant during the upcoming elections in November. I hope by this day in age, most people know that the American media can be a little bit biased… But that is a whole other topic.

Most people struggle with life balance simply because they havn’t paid the price to decide what is really important to them- Steven Covey

Don’t let this be you, and surely don’t let the media tell you what they think is important for you, because you will just be misled. Values of the media, in my opinion, should not be those that a life should be built around. Don’t let the media be in the driver seat of your life (maybe they could be in the trunk), but rather you yourself get in the driver seat and choose to be someone who proactivley seeks education.

The bottom line:

  1. Cut back on TV viewing time, taking in information with a grain of salt.
  2. Try to learn more about topics from different sources, like books.
  3. Do not let TV tell you what is important, because it usually isn’t.